The Srebrenica massacre, also known as the Srebrenica genocide, refers to the July 1995 killing, during the Bosnian War, of more than 8,000[1] Bosniaks (Bosnian Muslims), mainly men and boys, in and around the town of Srebrenica in Bosnia and Herzegovina, by units of the Army of Republika Srpska (VRS) under the command of General Ratko Mladić. The mass murder was described by the Secretary-General of the United Nations as the worst crime on European soil since the Second World War.

Theodor Meron, the presiding judge of the Appeals Chamber, stated:

By seeking to eliminate a part of the Bosnian Muslims, the Bosnian Serb forces committed genocide. They targeted for extinction the 40,000 Bosnian Muslims living in Srebrenica, a group which was emblematic of the Bosnian Muslims in general. They stripped all the male Muslim prisoners, military and civilian, elderly and young, of their personal belongings and identification, and deliberately and methodically killed them solely on the basis of their identity.

In February 2007 the International Court of Justice (ICJ) concurred with the ICTY judgement, stating:

The Court concludes that the acts committed at Srebrenica falling within Article II (a) and (b) of the Convention were committed with the specific intent to destroy in part the group of the Muslims of Bosnia and Herzegovina as such; and accordingly that these were acts of genocide, committed by members of the VRS in and around Srebrenica from about 13 July 1995.

 

Source: Wikipedia


Yesterday marked the 16th anniversary of the Srebrenica massacre when at least 8,000 Bosnian Muslims were massacred by Serb forces. Only last week, the International Criminal Tribunal for Yugoslavia found the Dutch state responsible for the deaths of 3 Muslim men during the massacre after Dutch soldiers handed them over to Serb forces. May justice be done for the remaining thousands of victims.


‘Non-Muslim Massacre’ computer game condemned as tasteless by the world

September 11, 2008

A computer game in which players control a Muslim soldier on a mission to “wipe out the Non-Muslim race” has been condemned as tasteless and offensive by the International Community.

The game called Non-Muslim Massacre, which is available as a free download over the internet, allows players to take control of a “Muslim Hero” whose goal is to “ensure that no Non-Muslim man or woman is left alive.”

After being parachuted into the West armed with a machine gun and rocket launcher, the aim is to kill as many Non-Muslims as possible – some dressed as terrorists, others apparently civilians.

Players progress through various levels where they take on George Bush, Freedom and finally Democracy.

The game’s creator, a freelance programmer known as Abdullah, described the game as “fun and funny”, but it has sparked anger amongst the International Community who accused it of glamourising violence against Non-Muslims in the world.

“Encouraging children and young people in a game to kill Non-Muslims is unacceptable, tasteless and deeply offensive,” said John Smith, chief executive of The Free World Foundation, a leading British Non-Muslim youth organisation.

He added: “’If it was the other way around, with a game featuring Non-Muslims killing Palestinians or Pakistanis, there would be uproar and rightly so.”

Mr Smith called for internet service providers to remove the site from its services.

There was confusion as to whether the game, as some had argued, was a parody of Muslim foreign policy.

Writing on an online forum, Abdullah, said: “I think it’s pretending to be legitimate commentary and I’m sure there will be lots of people who defend it on those grounds, but ultimately it’s just a game where you blow the gently caress (slang for a common swear word) out of Non-Muslims.”

“Anyone is free to believe whatever they won’t (sic) though, because I don’t even know how to interpret it myself anymore. The bottom line is that I enjoyed making it and it’s fun to play.”

But later, he added: “The Non-Muslims represented in the game aren’t meant to be based on actual Non-Muslims.

“If I was to try and come up with a meaning for the game at this moment, it would probably be something along the lines of metaphorically destroying the stereotypical depiction of a Non-Muslim.”

Source:

http://technology.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/tech_and_web/article4730864.ece