Response by Yemeni Nobel Peace prize winner in 2011 Tawakkul Karman* when asked about her Hijab By Journalists and how it is not proportionate with her level of intellect and education, she replied:
“Man in The early times was almost naked, and as his intellect evolved he started wearing clothes. What I am today and what I’m wearing represents the highest level of thought and civilization that man has achieved, and is not regressive. It’s the removal of clothes again that is regressive back to ancient TIMES”****

Noble Laurette from Yemen, Tawakul Karman.



Yesterday marked the 16th anniversary of the Srebrenica massacre when at least 8,000 Bosnian Muslims were massacred by Serb forces. Only last week, the International Criminal Tribunal for Yugoslavia found the Dutch state responsible for the deaths of 3 Muslim men during the massacre after Dutch soldiers handed them over to Serb forces. May justice be done for the remaining thousands of victims.


There is a game plan… When there’s a favoured dictator and he’s getting into trouble, support him as long as possible. When it becomes impossible… send him off somewhere, issue ringing declarations about your love of democracy, and then try to restore the old regime, maybe with new names. And that’s done over and over again. It doesn’t always work… [but] that’s what’s going on in Egypt and Tunisia. – Noam Chomsky


There was once a civilisation that was the greatest in the world.

It was able to create a continental super-state that stretched from ocean to ocean, and from northern climes to tropics and deserts. Within its dominion lived hundreds of millions of people, of different creeds and ethnic origins.

One of its languages became the universal language of much of the world, the bridge between the peoples of a hundred lands. Its armies were made up of people of many nationalities, and its military protection allowed a degree of peace and prosperity that had never been known. The reach of this civilisation’s commerce extended from Latin America to China, and everywhere in between.

And this civilisation was driven more than anything, by invention. Its architects designed buildings that defied gravity. Its mathematicians created the algebra and algorithms that would enable the building of computers, and the creation of encryption. Its doctors examined the human body, and found new cures for disease. Its astronomers looked into the heavens, named the stars, and paved the way for space travel and exploration.

Its writers created thousands of stories. Stories of courage, romance and magic. Its poets wrote of love, when others before them were too steeped in fear to think of such things.

When other nations were afraid of ideas, this civilisation thrived on them, and kept them alive. When censors threatened to wipe out knowledge from past civilisations, this civilisation kept the knowledge alive, and passed it on to others.

While modern Western civilisation shares many of these traits, the civilisation I’m talking about was the Islamic world from the year 800 to 1600, which included the Ottoman Empire and the courts of Baghdad, Damascus and Cairo, and enlightened rulers like Suleiman the Magnificent.

Although we are often unaware of our indebtedness to this other civilisation, its gifts are very much a part of our heritage. The technology industry would not exist without the contributions of Arab mathematicians. Sufi poet-philosophers like Rumi challenged our notions of self and truth. Leaders like Suleiman contributed to our notions of tolerance and civic leadership.

And perhaps we can learn a lesson from his example: It was leadership based on meritocracy, not inheritance. It was leadership that harnessed the full capabilities of a very diverse population–that included Christianity, Islamic, and Jewish traditions.

This kind of enlightened leadership — leadership that nurtured culture, sustainability, diversity and courage — led to 800 years of invention and prosperity.

In dark and serious times like this, we must affirm our commitment to building societies and institutions that aspire to this kind of greatness. More than ever, we must focus on the importance of leadership– bold acts of leadership and decidedly personal acts of leadership.

With that, I’d like to open up the conversation and see what we, collectively, believe about the role of leadership.

HP


“Some got plans of killing me just to literally vanish me physically like aborigines”  – Lowkey

 


Has anyone heard the new track from the artist Bruno Mars titled ‘Grenade’? It’s a very catching tune that invites to be listened to again and again. The song is about how the woman he loves does not feel the same way as he does about her. After watching the video clip to the song to the end, I must say I find it a bit morbid. If you watch the video till the end, you will understand what I am taking about. Second, he keeps singing throughout the track, how he’d catch a grenade for her; throw his hand on a blade for her; he’d jump in front of a train for her and how he’d do anything for her. All I have to say to that is did he try making her breakfast for her every day or wash the dishes for her or do the shopping for her or change the channel for her?

If you’re interested, below is the video of the song ‘Grenade’